Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Optical illusions are particularly popular with social media users. Some people also wonder how their pets will react to optical illusions. A new study took this curiosity one step further and tested the lions’ response to optical illusions.

To date, videos have been shared that reveal that illusions have an impact on pets as well as on humans. One of the most popular videos shared was the combination of the kitten and Akiyoshi Kitaoka’s famous “Rotating Snakes” illusion of Rasmus B├ą├ąth, a scientist at Lund University in Sweden.

More than 6 million videos have been watched on YouTube since 2013, leading to further experimental research and surveys of cat owners. In a survey, 29% of respondents said their pets reacted to Rotating Snakes. The results published in Psychology in 2014 revealed that the cats who perceive the Rotating Snakes model, although uncertain, perceive the illusion.

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Now a large team of researchers at the University of Padua in Italy, the University of Queen Mary in London, England, and Parco Natura Viva have revealed that the lions find the Rotating Snakes illusion impressive.

The team collected behavioral data from three lions in Parco Natura Viva, Safia, Kianga and Lubaya. He created 3 sets of stimuli to find out if the lions were interested in the Rotating Snakes pattern. The Rotating Snakes illusion and one of the two control designs give the effect of misleading movement, while the second control stimulus is a pattern created from the same basic elements as the Rotating Snakes illusion, which stops the illusion effect.

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Lions Discovered to Be Affected Like Humans By Optical Illusions

Scientists created and presented 3 copies of each image to avoid lion competition. 9 video recordings, each lasting 5 hours, were taken over a period of one month. The team collected data on the individual and social behavior of lions in the period after visual stimuli were added to their habitats.

Two of the lions (Lubaya and Safia) preferred the Illusion of the Rotating Snakes in two control visualizations. The video images showed lions biting or dragging the paintings. He showed that these movements were influenced by deceptive movements of lions.

The third female lion (Jianga) did not react differently to misleading stimuli. However, he exhibited positive behavioral changes associated with the presentation of the visuals. First of all, Kianga reduced the frequency of lying down (excessive lying, which can be a sign of stress in feline) and increased attention in his behavior.

It was suggested that these behaviors and visual wealth had a positive effect on the lion’s mood. In addition to cats, the results of the research added lions to the list of rhesus monkeys, guppies and zebra fish.

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